Female, 16, NYC. Just trying to get through high school at the moment. White, INTJ, she/her pronouns.

 

fierceblanket asked
So I noticed most of the scary/horror/paranormal blogs out there are run by females. That's cool as hell, but do you have any explanation why? Other than boys are scary cats.

sixpenceee:

mooncustafer:

sixpenceee:

It’s part of our master plan to be directors of the skeleton war and then rule the world 

When we wake up soaked in our own blood, it just means a tiny parasitic human has not infected our body this month.

Can you even fathom how powerful we are?

huffingtonpost:

Girl Who Was Called ‘Ugly’ After Donating Hair To Cancer Patients Gets Major Support From Internet

A few snips at the hair salon turned Jetta Fosberg’s selfless act into a school nightmare.

After the 10-year-old Ohio girl cut and donated 14 inches of her hair to Wigs for Kids, an organization that supports children who have lost their hair due to cancer treatments, she started being bullied at school, her mom told WHIO News in Dayton.

For what happened with the bullies from Jetta’s school go here. 

To show support for Jetta, “like” her anti-bullying page on Facebook.

gaywrites:

Today begins LGBT History Month! Let’s celebrate our victories, remember our roots, and never stop making history.

Anonymous asked
how do you write a character who self harms?

slitheringink:

Being that it’s Mental Illness Awareness Week, I wanted to address this ask, as well as preface it with some important information. A lot of people suffer from mental illness, myself included, and though at times it may seem like the world is caving in with darkness all around, please understand that you’re not alone. No matter what you’re not the only one dealing with these problems, and I’m telling you now that you don’t have to be afraid. It’s okay to get help, to talk to someone, and I urge you to do so if you’re feeling trapped by what’s going on inside of your head.

US Hotlines (for all sorts of things):

  • Depression: 1-630-482-9696
  • Suicide: 1-800-784-8433
  • LifeLine: 1-800-273-8255
  • Trevor Project: 1-866-488-7386
  • Sexuality Support: 1-800-246-7743
  • Eating Disorders: 1-847-831-3438
  • Rape and Sexual Assault: 1-800-656-4673
  • Grief Support: 1-650-321-5272
  • Runaway: 1-800-843-5200, 1-800-843-5678, 1-800-621-4000
  • Exhale: After Abortion Hotline/Pro-Voice: 1-866-4394253
  • Child Abuse: 1-800-422-4453

Extended list with hotlines from other countries. 

If you ever feel like you have no one to talk to, I’m just an ask away. I mean it.

As far as this ask goes, I ended up passing off the response to my buddy Mel, since I have no personal experience with it. Click the link below to continue. It’s been tagged appropriately. SUPER DETAILED ANSWER BELOW.

-Morgan

———————————

Read More

Things I wish I knew when I started tumbling

gallifreyansquid:

karatam:

colsandbradders:

i am so slow

you can look at the posts on a certain day?

jfc

url.tumblr.com/day/2012/12/25 <- what you posted last christmas

omfg chRIST WHY DIDN’T I KNOW THIS BEFORE????

makes my fckn life EASIER

#WHY ISN’T THIS SHIT IN THE HELP SECTION

BECAUSE ABSOLUTELY NOTHING OF USE IS EVER IN THE HELP SECTION

I MUST SPREAD THE WORD TO MY FOLLOWERS

(Source: gay4liam)

calippygian:

plumbat:

captain-rel:

perpugilliam:

lizawithazed:

mechabre:

this is so incredibly important to me holy shit
an article about an agender person’s identity ON THE FRONT PAGE OF THE WASHINGTON POST
FRONT AND CENTER!!!!!
IM JUST
AGHAFDHF!! SJFGSJS!! JSHFKA!! HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO ME

this kind of visibility is excellent, but I’m curbing my enthusiasm until I can read the article. :/

Read here: http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/when-no-gender-fits-a-quest-to-be-seen-as-just-a-person/2014/09/20/1ab21e6e-2c7b-11e4-994d-202962a9150c_story.html :)

I read the whole frigging thing and I loved it. I’m agender and I really appreciate the way this was written. I actually was crying a little by the end.

Everyone should know that this happened, it is kind of a big deal.

I’m so happy about this!!!!

calippygian:

plumbat:

captain-rel:

perpugilliam:

lizawithazed:

mechabre:

this is so incredibly important to me holy shit

an article about an agender person’s identity ON THE FRONT PAGE OF THE WASHINGTON POST

FRONT AND CENTER!!!!!

IM JUST

AGHAFDHF!! SJFGSJS!! JSHFKA!! HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO ME

this kind of visibility is excellent, but I’m curbing my enthusiasm until I can read the article. :/

Read here: http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/when-no-gender-fits-a-quest-to-be-seen-as-just-a-person/2014/09/20/1ab21e6e-2c7b-11e4-994d-202962a9150c_story.html :)

I read the whole frigging thing and I loved it. I’m agender and I really appreciate the way this was written. I actually was crying a little by the end.

Everyone should know that this happened, it is kind of a big deal.

I’m so happy about this!!!!

scarybeam:

gaywrites:

Vocativ has released an excellent interactive graphic mapping trans rights across the country. Visibility and societal acceptance are progressing, but there is so much left to do. (via Vocativ

i fucking love texas

http://lovejoybliss.tumblr.com/post/100593411242

cumberdoom:

papermonocle:

Things I learnt today: During WW1, MI5 used Girl Guides to send secret messages. They used Girl Guides because they quickly found that Boy Scouts couldn’t be trusted and were’t efficient enough.

At the start of the

NEW VIRUS FOUND!!

ykfinch:

traveler-trevor:

Someone submitted a link but it’s actually a virus. I clicked it because I thought it was something Photoshop related as it was submitted to YeahPs. It sent me to a page saying:

image

WHAT EVER YOU DO DON’T CLICK IT OR LOG IN BECAUSE IT DELETES YOUR BLOG! MY FRIEND OPENED IT AND LOGGED BACK IN!

image

The person who is spreading this is someone called lastinganime”.

image

REBLOG THIS AND SPREAD AWARENESS!

Time to spread this like A. BUCKIN’. WILDFIRE!!!

oH GOD

(Source: lovoto)

mommapolitico:

mychemicalromances:

countdowntoinfinitecrisis:

Hey kids, it’s time for Rewriting History with Judge Andrew Napolitano. 

No joke, in the Texas public school system elementary students are taught that tariffs were the reason for the civil war, not slavery. We had an entire curriculum built around it.

goddamnit texas

Don’t forget that as one of the largest textbook markets, many other states have to buy Texas-approved textbooks. Not only does Texas screw up their own children, but they screw up the kids of other states as well.

(Source: sandandglass)

thepoliticalfreakshow:

BREAKING: Here’s The Map Of What Marriage Equality Looks Like In The US Today (UPDATED 10/21/14)

Same-sex couples can marry in a majority of states in the country — something that was not true until October 2014. Since the Supreme Court decided not to hear appeals of challenges to five states’ marriage bans on Oct. 6, the ground has been shifting quickly.
As the process continues to play out, BuzzFeed News will be updating this map and the descriptions below to keep tabs on what’s happening at any given moment in the many challenges to bans playing out across the country.


States With Full Marriage Equality:
In the less than 10-and-a-half years since same-sex couples began marrying in Massachusetts, 24 other states and Washington, D.C., have joined the ranks of states where same-sex couples can marry.
In 13 jurisdictions, lawmakers voted for marriage equality — although voters initially reversed that action in Maine and the legislation was vetoed in California. The other 11 jurisdictions: Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, and Washington, D.C.
Voters in three states approved marriage equality at the polls: Maine in an initiative the reversed voters’ earlier decision, as well as Maryland and Washington, where efforts to reverse marriage equality through a referendum were rebuffed.
State courts, considering state law, found a right to marriage equality in Hawaii, Massachusetts, California, Connecticut, Iowa, New Jersey, and New Mexico — although constitutional amendments later reversed those decisions in Hawaii and California.
Finally, beginning with Utah, the final frontier of marriage equality — federal courts considering federal rights — led to marriage equality after courts found bans on same-sex couples’ marriages to be unconstitutional in 10 states: Arizona, Colorado, Indiana, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.


States With Marriage Equality, But With Related Appeal Still Pending:
In this quickly changing environment, there are a growing number of states where same-sex couples are able to marry — but a related appeal, from some person or organization, is ongoing.
In Oregon, the National Organization for Marriage attempted to intervene in the case and was denied. They appealed that denial, were rejected, and have asked the full appeals court to rehear their appeal. In light of the Supreme Court’s 2013 decision that outside groups have no standing to appeal a marriage decision when state or local officials no longer are appealing the issue, NOM is unlikely to succeed in this appeal.
In Nevada, the Coalition for the Protection of Marriage has asked the full appeals court to rehear last week’s decision striking down Nevada’s ban on same-sex couples’ marriages. For the same reason as with the Prop 8 case, the coalition here is unlikely to succeed in this appeal request.
In North Carolina, state lawmakers have attempted to intervene in marriage litigation and could attempt to appeal decisions ending the state’s marriage ban.
In Alaska and Idaho, officials have said they will be appealing the district court and appeals court decisions, respectively, further.


States With A Marriage Decision On Hold Pending Appeal:
Several decisions in favor of marriage equality or requiring recognition of same-sex couples’ marriages granted elsewhere are on hold, or stayed, while appeals are ongoing.
These include federal appeals in the 5th Circuit, 6th Circuit, and 11th Circuit courts of appeals, as well as some state courts.
In the 5th Circuit, appeals are pending from Texas, where the state’s ban was ruled to be unconstitutional, and Louisiana, where it was upheld.
In the 6th Circuit, arguments were held in early August regarding all four states’ bans. A decision is eagerly awaited, and it will address the marriage ban in Kentucky and Michigan and marriage recognition in Ohio and Tennessee. In all four states, the state lost at the trial court.
In the 11th Circuit, an appeal is pending from Florida, where the state’s ban was struck down in the trial court.
State court appeals are pending in three states, where trial courts struck down the bans in Arkansas, Florida, and Louisiana.


States With Marriage Recognition, But Not Full Marriage Equality:
After a Missouri state court ordered that out-of-state marriages of same-sex couples must be recognized in the state, Missouri’s attorney general announced the state would not be appealing the decision.


States Where Marriage Equality Is Expected To Follow In Short Order:
Because four federal appeals courts have decided that state bans on same-sex couples’ marriages are unconstitutional, that is the precedent in — or law of — those circuits. It is expected, therefore, that other states in those circuits with marriage bans will have those bans struck down in short order.
In the 4th Circuit, South Carolina officials continue to defend the ban and a federal case challenging the ban is pending.
In the 9th Circuit, Montana still bans same-sex couples from marrying and a federal case is pending.
In the 10th Circuit, Kansas officials continue to defend the ban. State court proceedings challenging the ban are pending the state, as is a federal challenge.


States Still Awaiting Action On Marriage Equality:
There are only six states without marriage equality or marriage recognition where marriage equality is not anticipated in short order due to circuit precedent and where no marriage decisions are on hold pending appeal.
They are Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota.
There are pending marriage, marriage recognition, or divorce cases pending in some of these states, but there have been no decisions in favor of same-sex couples there thus far.

Source: Chris Geidner for Buzzfeed News

thepoliticalfreakshow:

BREAKING: Here’s The Map Of What Marriage Equality Looks Like In The US Today (UPDATED 10/21/14)

Same-sex couples can marry in a majority of states in the country — something that was not true until October 2014. Since the Supreme Court decided not to hear appeals of challenges to five states’ marriage bans on Oct. 6, the ground has been shifting quickly.

As the process continues to play out, BuzzFeed News will be updating this map and the descriptions below to keep tabs on what’s happening at any given moment in the many challenges to bans playing out across the country.

States With Full Marriage Equality:


In the less than 10-and-a-half years since same-sex couples began marrying in Massachusetts, 24 other states and Washington, D.C., have joined the ranks of states where same-sex couples can marry.

In 13 jurisdictions, lawmakers voted for marriage equality — although voters initially reversed that action in Maine and the legislation was vetoed in California. The other 11 jurisdictions: Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, and Washington, D.C.

Voters in three states approved marriage equality at the polls: Maine in an initiative the reversed voters’ earlier decision, as well as Maryland and Washington, where efforts to reverse marriage equality through a referendum were rebuffed.

State courts, considering state law, found a right to marriage equality in Hawaii, Massachusetts, California, Connecticut, Iowa, New Jersey, and New Mexico — although constitutional amendments later reversed those decisions in Hawaii and California.

Finally, beginning with Utah, the final frontier of marriage equality — federal courts considering federal rights — led to marriage equality after courts found bans on same-sex couples’ marriages to be unconstitutional in 10 states: Arizona, Colorado, Indiana, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

States With Marriage Equality, But With Related Appeal Still Pending:


In this quickly changing environment, there are a growing number of states where same-sex couples are able to marry — but a related appeal, from some person or organization, is ongoing.

In Oregon, the National Organization for Marriage attempted to intervene in the case and was denied. They appealed that denial, were rejected, and have asked the full appeals court to rehear their appeal. In light of the Supreme Court’s 2013 decision that outside groups have no standing to appeal a marriage decision when state or local officials no longer are appealing the issue, NOM is unlikely to succeed in this appeal.

In Nevada, the Coalition for the Protection of Marriage has asked the full appeals court to rehear last week’s decision striking down Nevada’s ban on same-sex couples’ marriages. For the same reason as with the Prop 8 case, the coalition here is unlikely to succeed in this appeal request.

In North Carolina, state lawmakers have attempted to intervene in marriage litigation and could attempt to appeal decisions ending the state’s marriage ban.

In Alaska and Idaho, officials have said they will be appealing the district court and appeals court decisions, respectively, further.

States With A Marriage Decision On Hold Pending Appeal:


Several decisions in favor of marriage equality or requiring recognition of same-sex couples’ marriages granted elsewhere are on hold, or stayed, while appeals are ongoing.

These include federal appeals in the 5th Circuit, 6th Circuit, and 11th Circuit courts of appeals, as well as some state courts.

In the 5th Circuit, appeals are pending from Texas, where the state’s ban was ruled to be unconstitutional, and Louisiana, where it was upheld.

In the 6th Circuit, arguments were held in early August regarding all four states’ bans. A decision is eagerly awaited, and it will address the marriage ban in Kentucky and Michigan and marriage recognition in Ohio and Tennessee. In all four states, the state lost at the trial court.

In the 11th Circuit, an appeal is pending from Florida, where the state’s ban was struck down in the trial court.

State court appeals are pending in three states, where trial courts struck down the bans in Arkansas, Florida, and Louisiana.

States With Marriage Recognition, But Not Full Marriage Equality:


After a Missouri state court ordered that out-of-state marriages of same-sex couples must be recognized in the state, Missouri’s attorney general announced the state would not be appealing the decision.

States Where Marriage Equality Is Expected To Follow In Short Order:


Because four federal appeals courts have decided that state bans on same-sex couples’ marriages are unconstitutional, that is the precedent in — or law of — those circuits. It is expected, therefore, that other states in those circuits with marriage bans will have those bans struck down in short order.

In the 4th Circuit, South Carolina officials continue to defend the ban and a federal case challenging the ban is pending.

In the 9th Circuit, Montana still bans same-sex couples from marrying and a federal case is pending.

In the 10th Circuit, Kansas officials continue to defend the ban. State court proceedings challenging the ban are pending the state, as is a federal challenge.

States Still Awaiting Action On Marriage Equality:


There are only six states without marriage equality or marriage recognition where marriage equality is not anticipated in short order due to circuit precedent and where no marriage decisions are on hold pending appeal.

They are Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota.

There are pending marriage, marriage recognition, or divorce cases pending in some of these states, but there have been no decisions in favor of same-sex couples there thus far.

Source: Chris Geidner for Buzzfeed News

siriusblaque:

narcissa malfoy was probably the most powerful occlumens in hogwarts history and nobody knew

she literally stood up to lord voldemort and lied that harry potter was dead and i don’t know about you but if i were an evil ruler i would probably want to triple-check that my nemesis was, you know, actually deceased

voldemort had actual doubts about snape

narcissa swans on by without a whisper, without a second glance